Electrical and Computer Engineering Location: Online
Add to Calendar 2020-06-08T10:00:00 2020-06-08T10:00:00 America/New_York Doctoral Dissertation Proposal for Tianhui Zhu Thermoelectric Transport in Two Dimensions  ABSTRACT: As the modern electronics shrink towards nanoscale, the device performance becomes limited by the increasing dissipated power density. Proper thermal management is a major challenge in device designs. Thermoelectric devices can pump heat using electrical energy and can be used to cool the chips. They are also used to convert thermal energy into electrical energy, and hence can be used to recycle industrial and residential waste heat into electric power. Online

Thermoelectric Transport in Two Dimensions

 

https://virginia.zoom.us/j/96866823031

Meeting ID 968 6682 3031

 

Abstract:

As the modern electronics shrink towards nanoscale, the device performance becomes limited by the increasing dissipated power density. Proper thermal management is a major challenge in device designs. Thermoelectric devices can pump heat using electrical energy and can be used to cool the chips. They are also used to convert thermal energy into electrical energy, and hence can be used to recycle industrial and residential waste heat into electric power.

This dissertation focuses on thermal and thermoelectric transport in two dimensional samples, including in-plane and cross-plane transport in few-layer van der Waals materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides, and thin films of covalently bounded materials, such as silicon.

The proposed research work is two-fold. The first part is to design an experiment to reliably measure the in-plane thermal conductivity of thin films supported on a substrate over a broad temperature range. This is achieved by combining the thermoreflectance imaging technique and the heat spreader method in a specially engineered cryostat, and is tested on silicon thin films with and without periodic holes.

The second section of the proposed research centers around the thermoelectric properties of 2D transitional metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) and the factors affecting their performance in a device. The effect of contact interfaces on the cross-plane thermoelectric performance of WSe2 and an in-plane study of thermoelectric transport in few-layer TMDs are presented.