BME doctoral student Katie Knaus has won an all-university graduate teaching award. Greg Medlock, who graduates this May, is the 2019 Outstanding Biomedical Engineering Graduate Student and winner of the School of Medicine's Hungerford Prize. BME graduate students have won these awards more often than not, over the past five years.

Katie Knaus

Katie Knaus Wins an All-University Graduate Teaching Award

The All-University Graduate Teaching Awards honor students from across the entire University who have demonstrated exceptional achievement in undergraduate instruction. Katie is the third BME PhD student to win an All-UVA GTA Award since 2015 (past five years). Katie's accolades also include the SEAS Teaching Fellowship, Tomorrow’s Professor Today, American Society of Biomechanics (ASB) PhD Competition (1st Place), Student Representative of the Executive Board of the ASB, and NSFGRP Honorable Mention.

From Katie’s nomination letter

“Katie has more teaching experience than most engineering PhD students, and she has made a tremendous impact on a great many undergraduate students through her various activities. She has served as a teaching assistant twice, co-taught a required second-year BME class, mentored over 20 undergraduate students in the lab, lectured in several classes through the Tomorrows Professor Today program, and taught upwards of 100+ K-12 students about biomechanics. She was elected as the Student Representative on the Executive Board of the American Society of Biomechanics, and her leadership qualities were so impressive that the ASB President invited her to speak to the society about effective leadership strategies! What Katie has going for her is BOTH quantity AND quality. She is truly the “all-around” future intellectual leader who is going to be a fantastic professor one day."

- Silvia Blemker, PhD, Professor of BME

 

Greg Medlock with Jason Papin

Greg Medlock (right) with his PhD mentor Dr. Jason Papin.

Greg Medlock Wins the Hungerford Prize

Greg Medlock was selected as the 2019 Outstanding Graduate Student in Biomedical Engineering. That put him in the running for the School of Medicine's Jill E. Hungerford, Ph.D. Prize, which he also won. BME graduate students have won the Hungerford Prize four out of the last five years. Greg's other accolades include the School of Medicine Wagner Fellowship, MITRE Hackathon (1st place), Novo Nordisk Data-Driven Biotechnology Conference Poster Prize (2nd place PhD student), NSFGRFP Honorable Mention, and John Bell McGaughy Graduate Fellowship.

From Greg’s nomination letter

“Greg’s PhD project is focused on the development of a quantitative framework to integrate data on the intracellular metabolic networks of microbes in a community. These computational models will be revolutionary in their ability to guide probiotic therapeutic strategies and in understanding fundamental aspects of the human microbiome. Greg has already made seminal contributions in the field. One key first-author paper published in Cell Systems received considerable news coverage. It was highlighted as a “Research Highlight” in the November 2018 issue of Nature Methods and again as a “Method to Watch” in the January 2019 issue of Nature Methods with a write-up of approaches to study “microbial interactions.” The paper received newspaper, television, social media and radio coverage. Greg has been instrumental in establishing collaboration between my lab and other labs at UVa and around the world. His expertise in network modeling, machine learning, data “wrangling,” and other such data science methods are creating completely new avenues of research for my group.”

- Jason Papin, PhD, Professor of BME

For Fellowships and Awards, see HERE

For NIH Training Grant Placement, see HERE.

For BME Going Pro Interns, see HERE.