Projects and Proposals

We now have twelve years’ experience taking biomedical innovations born in the academic environment and translating them into practical use.


Each year, the UVA-Coulter Translational Partnership invests approximately $700,000 in six to eight projects. These grants, typically $100,000, but ranging from $75,000 to $150,000, have been made to teams working in such diverse areas as diagnostic tests, research tools, therapeutics, imaging techniques, medical education and biomaterials.

No two projects have the same needs and that the path to commercialization will be different for a team building a medical device from one developing software. As a result, we develop a customized suite of services for all the research teams we work with.

  • Coulter Team led by Don Griffin

    UVA-Coulter builds networks of relationships around our researchers, connecting them with veteran entrepreneurs, investors and experts in such fields as clinical trials, regulation, and patents and licensing.

  • Coulter Project in the NICU

    Because every new technology has its own requirements and follows its own path to the marketplace, we approach each project differently.
     

  • Cerillo World's Smallest Multiwell Plate Reader

    The exchange of ideas, insight and information is the engine that moves innovative technologies from university laboratories to the marketplace,

Proposal Process

  • Application

    There are two paths to funding from the UVA-Coulter Translational Partnership.

    Annual Request for Proposals ($75,000 - $100,000 budget range).  Each year, UVA-Coulter issues a request for applications in February.  The proposal deadline is typically six to eight weeks later. UVA-Coulter values brevity.  Proposals are limited to five pages including selected bibliography, and CVs cannot exceed two pages

    Seed Funds ($5,000 to $40,000 budget range).  UVA-Coulter also awards small seed grants at any time on the basis of a two-page written summary of project aims and a budget.  These do not require UVA-Coulter Oversight Committee approval.  Researchers should note that the UVA-Coulter grants cover direct, but not indirect, costs.

    Contact Hannah Moore, Coulter Administrator

  • Selection

    The UVA-Coulter Oversight Committee evaluates proposals on the basis of innovation and scientific merit, potential health care impact, technical feasibility and the potential for commercialization.  During its May meeting, the UVA-Coulter Oversight Committee selects the most promising proposals.  At the committee’s July meeting, the principal investigators give a 10-minute presentation.  The committee announces its decision later that day.

    UVA-Coulter Oversight Committee
  • Postaward

    As projects mature, we provide guidance, information and contacts that project leaders can use to move their innovations toward commercialization. Depending on the project, this might include clinical trials, licensing, regulatory approval, patent protection, market development and customer acquisition and fundraising.

More...

  • Pre-proposal Guidance

    One of the responsibilities of the UVA-Coulter team is to stay abreast of research underway in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and across the University. As a result, we are often instrumental in connecting biomedical engineering faculty with potential collaborators, fostering relationships that can lead to projects eligible for UVA-Coulter funding.

    We also build relationships to existing teams considering UVA-Coulter funding, helping them access the resources across Grounds and from external sources. We work closely with them to strengthen their proposals and provide feedback as they hone their project presentations to the Advisory Committee. In doing so, we recognize that each project has its own narrative and its own strengths. Our goal is to help Coulter applicants craft the most compelling narrative for their technology.

    Contact David Chen, Coulter Program Director

  • Reporting and Renewal

    During the year of their award, Principal Investigators deliver oral progress reports at each of the four UVA-Coulter Oversight Committee meetings.  No summary report is required.  Principal investigators can apply for an additional year of support on a competitive basis.

    Contact Hannah Moore, Coulter Program Administrator

  • Timeline

    February/early March: Annual Request for Applications is issued.

    April: Deadline to submit proposal.

    Early Summer: Phase I triage review by the Coulter Oversight Committee.

    June/early July: Phase II oral presentation and review.

    July: Awards announced and funding begins.

     

    Do you fund proposals off cycle?

    Yes. Please contact coulter@virginia.edu with your project idea.

  • Frequently asked questions

    Do Coulter proposals go through the UVA Office of Sponsored Programs? 

    No. Coulter is a locally funded program. OSP review is not required. 

     

    Do Coulter proposals require Department Chair approval?

    Yes. This is particularly important for clinical faculty, in order to gain time release for research.

     

    Should I include indirect costs in the budget?

    No. Coulter is a locally funded program. Indirects are not assessed.

     

    Do I need to pre-identify the graduate student, post doc, or researcher who will work with me on the project?

    No. Coulter proposals do not need to have named or identified personnel.

     

    Are Coulter proposals reviewed externally?

    No. Projects are reviewed by the Coulter Oversight Committee. Review happens in two phases. Phase I is a triage review. Phase II is an invited oral presentation.

     

    What is the timeline?

    February/early March: Annual Request for Applications is issued.

    April: Deadline to submit proposal.

    Early Summer: Phase I triage review by the Coulter Oversight Committee.

    June/early July: Phase II oral presentation and review.

    July: Awards announced and funding begins.

     

    Do you fund proposals off cycle?

    Yes. Please contact coulter@virginia.edu with your project idea.

Projects Funded for 2018-2019

  • ERK-dependent suicide gene therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    ERK-dependent suicide gene therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    Matthew Lazzara (CHE/BME) and Benjamin Purow (Neurology)


    Here, we propose to take thenext steps toward clinical translation of our new suicide gene approach by: 1) Demonstrating and tuning its selective ability for cell killing across different cell types present in GBM tumors, and 2) Determining its utility as an effective therapy in mouse models of GBM.

  • Brain Attack and Neurological Deficit Identification Tool (BANDIT)

    Brain Attack and Neurological Deficit Identification Tool (BANDIT)

    Gustavo Rodhe (BME) and Andrew Southerland (Neurology)


    The goal of this project is to develop a quantitative screening tool for more accurate diagnosis and triage of stroke and LVO patients and implement it on a real time system capable of providing clinically relevant information for cases when expert neurologists are not immediately available.

  • Novel biosensor for clinical assessment of plantar-surface diabetic foot ulcers

    Novel biosensor for clinical assessment of plantar-surface diabetic foot ulcers

    Shayn Peirce Cottler (BME), Cassandra Fraser (Chemistry), Catherine Ratliff (Plastic Surgery), Chris Campbell (Plastic Surgery), Patrick Cottler (Plastic Surgery)


    First-in-man safety study of a novel biopolymer-based biosensor to assess the healing potential of diabetic foot ulcers, while expanding clinical utility to include evaluating the extremities of peripheral arterial disease patients.

  • Laryngeal reconstruction using microporous annealed particle hydrogel

    Laryngeal reconstruction using microporous annealed particle hydrogel

    Donald Griffin (BME) and James Daniero (Head and Neck Surgery)


    Validation of new injectible filler for the treatment of glottic incompetence and comparison of outcomes to the current standard. 

  • Development of a pulse sequence for rapid free-breathing and non-ECG gated CMR evaluation of heart failure

    Development of a pulse sequence for rapid free-breathing and non-ECG gated CMR evaluation of heart failure

    Michael Salerno (Cardiovascular Medicine/BME), John Mugler (Radiology/BME), and Dan Weller (ECE)


    The goal is to extend and validate our spiral Siemens product framework by developing a technique to simultaneously obtain cine and T1 mapping (or LGE) images with whole heart coverage.

  • Accelerated cine DENSE strain MRI using a novel simultaneous multislice method

    Accelerated cine DENSE strain MRI using a novel simultaneous multislice method

    Fred Epstein (BME) and Ken Bilchick (Cardiovascular Medicine)


    Development and evaluation of a novel simultaneous multislice (SMS) method for spiral cine DENSE to facilitate greater usage of strain imaging as a routine component of a rapid, efficient multiparametric cardiac MRI protocol.

  • Magnetogenetic approach to treat nervous system dysfunction

    Magnetogenetic approach to treat nervous system dysfunction

    Christopher Deppmann (Biology/BME), Ali Guler (Biology), and Nicole Deal (Orthopaedic Surgery)


    Optimizing the expression of magnetically gated actuators to make these tools as robust as possible, enuring that companies and academic labs may use them with ease, while also considering side effects and potential toxicity associated with their use.

Projects Funded for 2017-2018

  • Development of a 12-minute free-breathing cardiac MRI protocol for the evaluation of heart failure

    John Mugler (Radiology/BME) and Michael Salerno (Cardiovascular Medicine/BME)


    Developing a rapid free-breathing cine and LGE techniques based on UVA spiral pulse sequence technology to perform a comprehensive assessment of myocardial function and scar in heart failure in less than 15 minutes.

  • Designing antibiotics for bacterial uptake

    Peter Kasson (Molecular Physiology/BME) and Robert Striker (Infectious Diseases, U. Wisconsin-Madison)


    Developing a generalizable process to determine chemical features that determine whether a drug will reach its target in gram-negative bacteria and incorporate this into the lead optimization process--leading to an enabling technology that will have broad utility in antibiotic development.

  • Laryngeal Reconstruction using microporous annealed particle hydrogel

    Donald Griffin (BME) and James Daniero (Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery)


    The proposed work will likely reach a series of IP-generating milestones, including: 1) the first injectable scaffold that avoids both resorption and immunogenicity, 2) a novel material strategy for accelerated tissue integration, and 3) a treatment that restores clinical loss of vocal fold function due to glottic incompetence.

  • Novel biosensor for clinical assessment of plantar-surface diabetic foot ulcers

    Shayn Peirce Cottler (BME), Cassandra Fraser (Chemistry), Catherine Ratliff (Plastic Surgery), Chris Campbell (Plastic Surgery), Patrick Cottler (Plastic Surgery)


    UVA-owned technology has the potential to transform how plantar-surface diabetic ulcers are managed by providing a more direct and accurate assessment of healing potential, which will lead to more informed clinical decision making about the course of treatment for these difficult-to-manage wounds.

  • Real time ultrasound guidance for breast cancer margin oncology procedures

    John Hossack (BME), Timothy Showalter (Radiation Oncology) and David Brenin (Breast Surgery)


    Year 2 continuation, focused on device validation and improvement, with emphasis on patient studies, workflow, and technical improvements to address optimal workflow/efficacy.

  • A deep learning MRI framework for quantitative assessment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Craig Meyer (BME) and Chris Kramer (Cardiovascular Medicine)


    The goal of this study is to greatly improve the efficiency and robustness of quantitative cardiac magnetic resonance markers of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). These markers will initially be applied to the characterization of the important clinical problem of HCM, but the methods will be applicable to other cardiac diseases.

  • Verification and validation of a device for reducing the transmission of pathogens from hospital sink wastewater to patients

    William S. Guilford (BME), Amy Mathers (Infectious Disease), Shireen Kotay (Infectious Disease)


    Gather end-user feedback of the generation 2 device by deploying a “sink in a box” at three hospitals and redesign device using end-user feedback. Test to define the operational parameters in the UVA Sink Lab and submit for UL-certification.   

Projects Funded for 2016-2017

  • Feeding device for infants with cleft palate and other feeding disorders

    Silvia Blemker (BME) & Kathleen Borowitz (Pediatrics)


    The new design enables the infant to make more efficient use of the tongue in order to extract milk from the bottle, and it has different flow control inserts to all for variable flow rates that accommodate infants as they grow.

  • High resolution whole heart CMR perfusion imaging for improved diagnosis of coronary heart disease

    John Mugler (Radiology/BME) and Mike Salerno (Cardiovascular Medicine/BME)


    New spiral perfusion technique developed at UVA to achieve whole heart coverage with a spatial resolution of <1.5 mm.

  • Real-time ultrasound guidance for breast cancer margin oncology procedures

    John Hossack (BME), Timothy Showalter (Radiation Oncology) and David Brenin (Breast Surgery)


    Adapting the balloon applicator used in breast oncology to include a rotationally scanning small-scale ultrasound imaging catheter to perform intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) with real-time image guidance without the cost, complexity and radiation of CT.

  • Optimized predictive monitoring of non-ICU patients at risk for sepsis

    Laura Barnes (SIE) and Christopher Moore (Infectious Diseases)


    Overcomes the limitations of existing systems such as the SIRS criteria and a new clinical sepsis definition by developing a new computational framework for the prediction of sepsis using commonly available indicators and predicts the individual response to treatment after diagnosis.

  • Tissue Engineered Muscle Repair (TEMR) for treatment of Volumetric Muscle Loss (VML) of the hand

    George Christ (BME/Orthopaedic Surgery) and A. Bobby Chhabra (Orthopaedic Surgery)


    In order to further extend the clinical applications of our TEMR technology platform we propose to continue development of our second generation TEMR construct for applications to volumetric muscle loss injuries to intrinsic muscles of the hand.

  • Magnetogenetic approach for the treatment of nervous system injury

    Chris Deppmann (Biology/BME), Ali Guler (Biology) and Nicole Deal (Orthopaedic Surgery)


    Tests whether a novel remote nerve cell stimulation paradigm can promote regeneration in pre-clinical rodent models for nerve injury with the goal of moving magnetogenetic actuators into human trials for nervous system injury.

  • Lipid nanoparticle-based fluorescence detection technology for a new generation of high-sensitivity immunoassays

    Alexander Klibanov (Medicine/BME), Ayotunde Dokun (Endocrinology), Bruce Gaylinn (Endocrinology), and Leon Farhi (Endocrinology)


    Novel nanoparticle detection technology to ptovide a general solution to many assays in need of better performance, leading to a new generation of clinically important high sensitivity immunoassays with improved range, stability, simplicity and reproducibility.

  • Superbug Tracker

    Jason Papin (BME), Laura Barnes (SIE), Don Brown (CS), Jennifer Lobo (Public Health), Amy Mathers (Infectious Disease)


    Design of a context-aware surveillance systems for nosocomial outbreaks involving non-patient resevoirs.